ThirdLove

The disruptive lingerie retailer ThirdLove is set to open its first ever physical store later this year, introducing its Fit Finder” technology to bricks-and-mortar for the first time. In 2018, Ed Razek, chief marketing officer at L Brands, Victoria's Secret's parent company, said in a Vogue interview that Victoria's Secret was nobody's third love.” In response, Zak took out a full-page ad in the New York Times that was an open letter to Victoria's Secret.
Yotpo says that customers have since been sharing the brand much more effectively and with the right people - in the first three months of launch, 22.3% of those customers who clicked on referral links went on to make purchases, and many of those referred customers ended up becoming repeat customers.



Upper management purposefully kept themselves as far removed as possible, hours weren't great, the customers are mostly middle-aged, ultra-entitled white women, and there is a company culture of "positivity" that comes off as disingenuous and saccharine.
The company has come a long way from its original data collection system — asking women, via a Craigslist ad, to come to its San Francisco headquarters wearing their best bra and take a photo of their breasts with an app that could calculate their bust size.

Over at Vox, reporter Zoe Schiffer has an interesting story about ThirdLove, the upstart bra company that positions its lingerie as by women, for women.” Turns out that contrary to its feminist public image, actually working for the company seems pretty awful: employees complain about a bunch of things, including low pay, shitty benefits, and a co-CEO that bullies them.
When they arrived, they were surprised to find Zak's husband and co-CEO, David Spector, highly involved in their day-to-day work, with a management style described as condescending” and bullying.” This about-face was compounded by company norms — don't negotiate your salary, don't leave before 6 pm, don't work from home, don't skip a happy hour — that felt out of sync with the brand's external image.

Let's exceed their expectations.” Then, in case it wasn't already clear, she spelled it out: ThirdLove is the antithesis of Victoria's Secret.” The entire campaign seemed designed to show how woke, how feminist, how very different ThirdLove was from traditional bra makers — and it worked.
When they arrived, they were surprised to find Heidi Zak's husband and co-CEO, David Spector, highly involved in their day-to-day work, with a management style described as condescending” and bullying.” This about-face was compounded by company norms — don't negotiate your salary, don't leave before 6 pm, don't work from home, don't skip a happy hour — that felt out of sync with the brand's external image.

A Fast Company article titled Victoria's Secret threw shade at ThirdLove, and CEO Heidi Zak had the perfect response” described Zak as the founder without mentioning Spector at all. The super cool part is that ThirdLove ships you a backup size, so you can try on two bra sizes in the comfort of your own home (with all your favorite tops—it's handy to see how the bra looks under your clothes).
Beyond the positive feedback, there are also hard numbers that demonstrate a demand for the kind of personalized, fit-conscious approach that Heidi Zak brings to the lingerie market. And ThirdLove's T-shirt bra, through which many women discover the brand, continues to lure customers and introduce them to its other products, such as sleepwear.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *